Our Aging Workforce: Many Staying at Work Beyond Suggested Retirement Age

12 Oct Our Aging Workforce: Many Staying at Work Beyond Suggested Retirement Age

Working Beyond 66.2 Years of Age

As workers age, many still prefer to stay on the job or take on a different role at the same company, particularly if the work history at the same company is 10 years or more. Floor workers in a manufacturing company with years of experience can transition to a manager’s role, providing professional insights on how to accomplish various tasks in more effective ways.

Those with degrees can also rise higher in the company over time to earn better salaries while doing less physical work. This also reduces the chances of having accidents while on the job, although that is not always guaranteed.

Most older workers have taken the time to learn how to work with computers and the various software packages that a company might use, which adds value to a worker’s skill set. Computers, software programs, cell phones with applications (apps), smart televisions, and more, have required many in our working population to learn how to live life better once they have mastered such technology.

Phoenix workers compensation attorney

Working Out of Necessity

Aging workers, before reaching the Medicare enrollment age of 65, are also working longer because they can get health benefits, better health care, and medications, and can continue to add to savings and 401(K) plans. It also adds to the years and earnings calculation for social security when the worker reaches full retirement age.

Check out a more comprehensive overview of the retirement earnings test here to learn how much you can earn while collecting social security benefits. Always check the latest changes that can occur each year for what you will be receiving at retirement age. Wait (if you can) before collecting your benefits so you can keep adding to what you will receive at full retirement age, which is currently 66 or 67 years of age, depending on your birth year.

Other reasons for continuing to work can be that older people may not have been able to save enough money due to debt issues, mortgages, supporting a family, and sending children to college. Most older workers prefer to live in the manner they are accustomed to, with some slight reductions where applicable, such as buying a smaller one-level home. Such changes occur when physical disabilities require wheelchairs, ramps, avoiding the use of stairs, and more.

The Downside of Aging Today

There is now a higher unemployment rate among workers 65 and older, which occurred during the current recession caused by the pandemic, starting at the end of February of 2020 and the subsequent business shutdowns. Older workers, as a susceptible population group for getting COVID-19, lose their jobs if they cannot come back to work just yet during re-openings of the businesses they worked for.

Those who can work from home will be alright. But those who must be physically at work to do the job, will have issues retaining their jobs. Arizona workers compensation laws may change regarding COVID-19. A good idea is to call a Phoenix workers compensation attorney to find out more about the pandemic situation and working with the threat of COVID-19.

Arizona Injury Law Group offers experienced and Certified workers’ compensation lawyers and legal services for injured workers. Call for your free consultation! 602-346-9009.

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